Facts and Thoughts

28,826 notes

redefiningbodyimage:

jadelyn:

papswholenewworld:

pleasestopbeingsad:

Woah, it’s almost as though people who suffer from depression are still human beings with complex feelings and emotions! Who knew?!

Reblogging this for truth and relevance!

I remember reading about a case where an insurance company denied a woman coverage for her depression meds based on the fact that she had photos on Facebook that showed her smiling.
"If you ever smile that means you can’t really be depressed" needs to go diaf already. Like, what, you really *want* to discourage depressives from being able to feel even a tiny bit of happiness that breaks through the fog from time to time? Really?
Fucking sadist.
And not in the sexy way.

Not to mention for a lot of people (myself included) depression isn’t about having sad feelings….it’s more about having no feelings. Limitless emptiness, a flat emotional pallet, no ups and downs, just nothingness.
Having ANY emotions while in the midst of a depressive episode is wonderful, but it doesn’t magically poof away the depression.

redefiningbodyimage:

jadelyn:

papswholenewworld:

pleasestopbeingsad:

Woah, it’s almost as though people who suffer from depression are still human beings with complex feelings and emotions! Who knew?!

Reblogging this for truth and relevance!

I remember reading about a case where an insurance company denied a woman coverage for her depression meds based on the fact that she had photos on Facebook that showed her smiling.

"If you ever smile that means you can’t really be depressed" needs to go diaf already. Like, what, you really *want* to discourage depressives from being able to feel even a tiny bit of happiness that breaks through the fog from time to time? Really?

Fucking sadist.

And not in the sexy way.

Not to mention for a lot of people (myself included) depression isn’t about having sad feelings….it’s more about having no feelings. Limitless emptiness, a flat emotional pallet, no ups and downs, just nothingness.

Having ANY emotions while in the midst of a depressive episode is wonderful, but it doesn’t magically poof away the depression.

(via loveyoubud)

153,449 notes

cryptaniac:

bananneli:

I wish that there was a socially acceptable way to say, “I’m having a bad mental health day and need you to pay attention to me,” without alienating everyone.

or: “I’m having a bad mental health day and need to be on my own for a while so please don’t be mad if I cancel our plans on short notice.”

(Source: b-n-nn-li, via loveyoubud)

5 notes

lifewithra:

This is good info for anyone with autoimmune disease. Costochondritis is pretty common for us!

I got diagnosed with this before my fibro diagnosis.

lifewithra:

This is good info for anyone with autoimmune disease. Costochondritis is pretty common for us!

I got diagnosed with this before my fibro diagnosis.

12,547 notes

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

(via fibromyalgiasucks)